Welcome to my Keeping Each Other Well Blog!

January 10, 2012

Forest Bathing for Health

August 9, 2017

Thanks to the Society for the Protection of NH Forests and the White Mountain National Forest, the AMC, local hiking groups, and Conservation Trusts, we in NH are amply blessed with opportunities to walk in calm, sweet smelling, breathing woodlands, wherever we live. For wheelchair accessible trails, check out  www.traillink.com/stateactivity/nh-wheelchair-accessible-trails/.

Depending on whether we need to unwind by a thundering waterfall, scramble over rocks and granite slabs, be up high enough so the world spreads easily around us with lots of room for everyone, or whether we need to slide our back into a sage old maple and just breathe with the tree, there are such havens in or near every town.

Naturalists have been writing about forests for centuries, but other professions join them today. In the US, there is an Association of Nature and Forest Therapy Guide Training program. In Japan, doctors may legally prescribe forest bathing as a treatment for illness. Tree medicine melds nature with mindfulness.

Studies document the calming value of a walk among the trees.  On walk days, hostility and aggression decrease.  The book, “Your Brain on Nature”, by Eva Selhob and Alan Logan proposes Vitamin G (for green) as an essential for our health and well being. Our expression, “Go take a walk”, is a standard sure cure when someone is upset or confused.

The British medical journal, Lancet (5/17), found that access to green space was a greater predictor of health than income, eating well, or doctoring more often.

It is just about impossible to stay mired in problems when ravens are calling to us or when we see a patch of blueberries loaded with berries so late in the season, or when a boulder seat presents itself just when we need a little break or a tree branch reaches out a willing assist over a stretch on the rocks, or from an open window in early morning, sensing a breeze bringing in cool fresh air.

One day, a pair of yellow warblers watched me intently from their perch as we met eye to eye.  I gasped silently at their utter beauty and paused to soak in that spot long after they flew off.  Every bird, tree, and four-legged is part of this dance we call life.

Anthropologist, Mary Catherine Bateson, (Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson’s daughter), encourages us to learn to use the word “we” to include all life on Earth, to shape everything we do, and to protect this Earth we share. Our health depends on our action.

Yes! To Local Control and Local Decision Making!

July 13, 2017

Our grass roots opposition to the Northern Pass finally has a chance to weigh in on the consequences of the current Northern Pass plan. On NHPR’s EXCHANGE (7/10/17), Gov. Sununu said, “Let’s maintain local control and local decision making.”  He was referring to another town’s decisions, but here’s to equal rights for all towns in NH.

Perhaps the July 1 storm, which gutted roads the Northern Pass wants to bury the line under, could give Governor Sununu pause to realize that local citizens have valid reasons for burying the NP line down I93, where an intentionally designed median exists to house the underground line.

We all got a taste of the inconvenience of having commuter and school bus transportation roads torn up, detours and slow moving one-way traffic. Now, two weeks later, road crews continue with repairs just to make the roads passable. More time will be needed to finish the job.

Comment letters continue to arrive at the Site Evaluation Committee and appear on the SEC website: www.nhsec.nh.gov/projects/2015-06-comments.htm. Local people continue to implore the Site Evaluation Committee to recognize the threat to the health and safety of Grafton County residents the current NP proposal promises.

Every season is unique here in NH and draws visitors from all over the world. They always comment on the sheer beauty of a drive through our state, through our little towns. Summer visitors love our attractions, the chance to fish, swim, hike, bike, kayak. They enjoy our waterfalls, and especially our trees and the fact that it is so much easier to breathe up here.

To appreciate what we have here, all it takes is a drive south or west of New England to be met with a network of power lines in place of trees, lots of intersecting superhighways, and congested roadways.

We need to stand up for this land, not just for ourselves and our livelihood, but for all the people who count on being able to come here to relax, re-energize and breathe.

Let Gov. Chris Sununu know your concerns at State House, 107 N. Main St., Concord, NH 03301.

Also the SEC, c/o Pamela Monroe, Administrator, 21 S. Fruit St., Suite 10, Concord, NH 03301 or email: Pamela Monroe@sec.nh.gov.

“Vaccines Revealed” now available FREE

July 13, 2017

In January, “Vaccines Revealed”, a series of nine videos, unraveled the damage done by promoting, and even demanding as a requirement to attend school, that our children succumb to potentially life challenging or lethal vaccines. Here is an opportunity to view the whole series, led by peer reviewed researchers, for FREE, at www.vaccinesrevealed.com/free/.

Pharmaceutical companies and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) deny or suppress research studies regarding the cautionary use of vaccines. The CDC owns over 50 patents to vaccines – a major conflict of interest when establishing protocols. Top officials in the CDC continually move to executive positions in pharmaceutical companies and back again to work at the CDC. Of even greater concern is that in 1989, Big Pharma obviously greased the wheels for Congress to pass a law that people cannot sue Big Pharma for injury resulting from pharmaceuticals they produce.

General consensus in the series was that vaccines are potentially healthy but they need to be given one at a time, they must not contain aluminum or mercury, and they must not be given too early. Researchers and physicians cited newborns receiving their first vaccine before they left the hospital. It appears that the practice of giving too many at a time and at too young an age, is what has fed Autism rates. However, today the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) protocols include 46 doses of vaccine by the age of 5, 26 doses in the first 18 months, 69 doses from birth to age 18. This protocol is mandatory for entrance to schools and some forms of employment.

At issue today is the fact that the vaccines carry substances such as thymerisol (mercury), aluminum,formaldehyde, and other substances to stimulate an immune response. Many of these substances cross the blood brain barrier and result in neurogenitive diseases like Autism, Lyme disease, Bowel disease, ADHD, Shaken Baby Syndrome , vision and hearing problems, and more. Safer, more expensive vaccine mediums are available but one must know enough to ask for them.

In the 1950s, one in 1000 children came down with autism in the U.S. By 2000, the ratio was 1:250. By 2014, the ratio was 1: 68. By 2032, if the rise continues, 1:2 children born will be autistic, including every male childborn.

Also noted was the possible link between Chickenpox vaccine and the rising incidence of Shingles in adults. Formerly, when children contracted chickenpox naturally (a benign disease), they also provided adults around them with a natural booster of chickenpox and protection against shingles. Without the natural exposure, adults become vulnerable to Shingles, a more serious disease.

Frequently cited was the fact that in the years before vaccines were introduced, people woke up to the effects that general hygiene, water sanitation, and sanitized food handling, etc., reduced disease before vaccines were even produced. So, there is a question as to how much vaccines have eliminated and how much illness and death they have caused.

Because controlled, peer reviewed studies have been suppressed; only recently have they begun to be revealed. More studies of Amish children and Home Schooled children who have not received a battery of vaccines need to be encouraged and openly available to the public.

One such study is Jackson State University’s, “Pilot Comparative Study on the Health of Vaccinated and Unvaccinated Children”, led by epidemiologist Dr. Anthony Mawsom. The study of 666 Home Schooled children (39% were unvaccinated), found that fully vaccinated children may be trading the prevention of certain acute illnesses (chickenpox, whooping cough) for more chronic illnesses and neurodevelopmental disorders (ADHD and Autism).

Sweden has banned mandatory vaccinations, citing serious health concerns and the fact that they violate a citizen’s constitutional right to choose their own health care.

What can we do to inform ourselves? We can take the time to review above studies and share what we learn with our neighbors and friends. We can choose health care providers who inform themselves beyond the CDC and Pharmacy labels.

There will be more video presentations as more physicians come forward with the results they are seeing in their practice and more research is finding ways to be published. Unfortunately, physicians risk losing their license to practice, researchers have difficulty getting their findings published, and both groups may lose teaching positions/livelihood.

However, the tide is turning, the public is becoming more informed and actively demanding to have competent research on the safety and efficacy of every vaccine, and parental rights to decide what goes into and stays out of our bodies. We can support physicians and research that honor scientific inquiry.

Sobering news. For many of us, the clear wake up call continues.

 

Let’s Care For the Land that Gives Us Our Health

July 13, 2017

A June hike to the high peaks of New Hampshire guarantees a generous welcome of wildflowers. They have a brief blooming period before the plants begin forming berries. Our wet spring inspired an awesome array of blossoms.

This is a big year for Jack-in-the-Pulpits. Right now, Jack stands in his purple robe on the raised pulpit under a canopy like those found in old churches. Later in summer, Jack transforms to green berries and by fall the berries ripen to reddish/orange, holding next year’s seeds.

This is also a great year for Bunchberries, the plant with Dogwood family’s four little white petals, each pinched on the outer rim. By fall, bunches of red berries will appear bearing next year’s seeds.

Probably one of the reasons many of us find a woods walk or mountain trek so satisfying has to do with our just being another forest roamer checking out what happens in the forest, not just thinking about whatever we’ve done poorly, not about aches and pains, just about the wonder of all the beings in the forest, all the different trees with varied shapes and needles and leaves, and they all get along in their shared space, and remind us that we are part of the forest family.

It feels good to recognize and greet the trees, plants, mosses, ferns, the birds with their magical songs. Sometimes the birds even join us, out of curiosity, I suppose. A little Red-eyed Vireo hopped along the trail beside me one morning for several paces, enjoying the day together. The Vireo pecked around for vittles. I picked up stray branches we humans could stumble on and fling them away, a simple act of trail maintenance inspired by AMC leaders many years ago. It’s a way of saying, “Thanks!” to the forest and all the trail crews who do the big stuff.

Further up, near running water, Sphagnum moss mop-heads present themselves- all soggy and ready to go- keeping air moist, fresh, and breathable. Rocky trails, bounded by younger trees in all the right places offer a reliable assist over slippery rocks.

Finally the trail opens above treeline. Even with wind, it is a balm to be there, excited about the reliable assembly of rocks, and krumholz,  and finally,  mounds of Diapensia, Bearberry, Labrador tea, and any other regulars who have dropped in.

Ah…, New Hampshire…, how good to be here! Now to honor our forest by assuring whatever protection it needs so that we all share the possibility of good health in every day ahead.

 

Let’s Care For The Land That Gives Us Our Health

June 23, 2017

A June hike to the high peaks of New Hampshire guarantees a generous welcome of wildflowers. They have a brief blooming period before the plants begin forming berries. Our wet spring inspired an awesome array of blossoms.

This is a big year for Jack-in-the-Pulpits. Right now, Jack stands in his purple robe on the raised pulpit under a canopy like those found in old churches. Later in summer, Jack transforms to green berries and by fall the berries ripen to reddish/orange, holding next year’s seeds.

This is also a great year for Bunchberries, the plant with Dogwood family’s four little white petals, each pinched on the outer rim. By fall, bunches of red berries will appear bearing next year’s seeds.

Probably one of the reasons many of us find a woods walk or mountain trek so satisfying has to do with our just being another forest roamer checking out what happens in the forest, not just thinking about whatever we’ve done poorly, not about aches and pains, just about the wonder of all the beings in the forest, all the different trees with varied shapes and needles and leaves, and they all get along in their shared space, and remind us that we are part of the forest family.

It feels good to recognize and greet the trees, plants, mosses, ferns, the birds with their magical songs. Sometimes the birds even join us, out of curiosity, I suppose. A little Red-eyed Vireo hopped along the trail beside me one morning for several paces, enjoying the day together. The Vireo pecked around for vittles. I picked up stray branches we humans could stumble on and fling them away, a simple act of trail maintenance inspired by AMC leaders many years ago. It’s a way of saying, “Thanks!” to the forest and all the trail crews who do the big stuff.

Further up, near running water, Sphagnum moss mop-heads present themselves- all soggy and ready to go- keeping air moist, fresh, and breathable. Rocky trails, bounded by younger trees in all the right places offer a reliable assist over slippery rocks.

Finally the trail opens above treeline. Even with wind, it is a balm to be there, excited about the reliable assembly of rocks, and krumholz,  and finally,  mounds of Diapensia, Bearberry, Labrador tea, and any other regulars who have dropped in.

Ah…, New Hampshire…, how good to be here! Now to honor our forest by assuring whatever protection it needs so that we all share the possibility of good health in every day ahead.

 

Northern Pass Plot Thickens

May 26, 2017

The Northern Pass current proposal threatens the health and safety of Grafton County residents. Claims that the proposal would be cheaper than burying the line down I93 are simply not true. Here are potential dangers to residents that the NP is trying to hide.

Many old homes on our state roads where NP plans to bury the line have stone foundations. These homes were built close to the road before cars came in. Drilling required for burying the line risks and probably guarantees shaking the stones loose and crumbling the foundations of those houses. People not only risk catastrophic damage to their homes but their very lives if they do not vacate the premises.

Many residents have water rights across the road from their homes as roads often intersected people’s property. Those rights will be threatened with contamination by the power line.

School bus routes will be held up and children’s safety threatened getting on and off their bus. Children will be spending more time on the bus driving up transportation costs.

Landscaping for homes along the route risks being destroyed. Homes close to the road would lose their apple trees, rhododendron and other established shrubs. Limits would be placed on residents’ use of their own land with a buried line they must avoid.

Costs for accident injuries, fatalities, home restoration, artesian wells, school transportation costs, clogged commuter and tourist routes, and unnecessary disruption of neighborhoods will cost the NP project more in legal fees they carefully avoid adding in to their estimates. NP does not care if their current plan costs more because their private corporation stands to make more money once their long range plan is in place to sting New Hampshire residents with an archaic, expensive energy network.

The Department of Energy Supplement to the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) advises that fully buried transmission lines could use the already disturbed median corridors in place, for example in I93. Those wide medians were designed for just such projects in the interests of the general public. The NP project has consistently refused to consider using I93.

If Eversource-Hydro Quebec cared about the people of New Hampshire, they would not be trying to impose such a destructive route on our citizens. Instead, they will continue to withhold actual costs of their project to the people of New Hampshire.

That is, UNLESS we New Hampshire citizens actively say, “NO to Northern Pass!”  Send your letter to the Site Evaluation Committee, c/o Pamela Monroe, Administrator, 21 S. Fruit St., Suite 10, Concord, NH 03301 or email: Pamela.Monroe@sec.nh.gov.

Spring! Time for New Beginnings!

May 26, 2017

It’s Spring! Time to hike! The woods are alive with Painted Trillium, little Yellow Wood Violets, Wild Oats, Goldthread, and more!

While Fish and Game notes there have been almost as many rescues so far this year as for all of 2016, the good news is that more people are getting out and hiking. The physically fit are not the only ones on the trails. This spring, I am also meeting more of the not so physically fit on the trail, people who have decided to get out there and shape up! Their energy and delight in the forest is obvious and welcome!

To fully enjoy hiking, Hikesafe.com is an excellent website for information about hike planning, gear, hikes with kids, and hiker insurance. The first rule of thumb is to Carry Out What You Carry In. This includes orange peels, tissues, water bottles, etc. Our gift to the forest is that we Leave No Trace behind us.

The White Mountain Guide lists every trail in the White Mt. National Park, tells how to get to the trailhead, what you can expect on the trail terrain, the elevation gain, total mileage, and connecting links. This book with 4 maps is available in AMC Visitor centers,  book stores and State Park Visitor Centers. Many small trail guides for local areas are also available in book stores, general stores, the Rey center and specialty shops near the hiking area. Always ask.

Footgear needed depends on the hike. For well packed gravel trails like Smart’s Brook, the Flume Nature Walk, Lincoln Woods, or Mt. Agazziz, sneakers are fine.  A safer option for rocky trails and the granite slabs of higher elevations is a sturdy hiking boot with vibram sole that grips granite and gives support for awkward steps.

Best to start with short hikes on easy terrain. This gives you time to figure out what feels best for you, how much water and snacks you need, time to check out hiker information, perhaps join a local group, and gradually figure out what works best for you and your family.

Keep an eye out for Coltsfoot, the little yellow ray flower people often mistake for dandelion. This early bloomer puts up its flower first and the leaves that give it its name come later. You’ll find it along roadsides and gravelly places.

Wherever you find yourself, enjoy spring’s abundant welcome! May we each be inspired to honor and protect our forests, land and waters so that abundance will continue to flourish.

Northern Pass Ugly Truth Comes Out!

April 27, 2017

The ugly truth is that the Northern Pass proposal is a scam to benefit Eversource and Hydro Quebec, not to provide NH with clean, renewable energy. HQ energy under the current NP plan would come at great cost to the environment, to neighborhoods, home landscaping, home water lines crossing Route 3, and wetlands. Installation of the line would jeopardize businesses, people commuting from their homes, school buses and tourist travel as Route 3 and other roads were torn up. All so that Eversource would profit from the rent money for the line, not the people of NH.

The Department of Energy Supplement to the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) advises that fully buried transmission lines could use the already disturbed median corridors in place, for example in I93. Those wide medians were designed for just such projects in the interests of the general public. The NP project has consistently refused to consider using I93.

Richard Widhu of Nashua noted in a Letter to the Editor of the Union Leader on 4/25/17 that the 2015  EIS advised that burying the line along existing medians could also bring 3,766 more construction jobs and 544 more permanent jobs. Why on earth would the Site Evaluation Committee (SEC) even consider any other option if they responsibly served the people of NH?

Estimated cost would be 1 ½ times that proposed by the Northern Pass. However, considering all the blasting, well replacements, wood clearing costs, and law suits filed against NP to put up 135’ towers for the proposed above ground line and undergrounding through secondary roads, there will certainly be additional costs that magically appear at the end of the project if the current plan is approved.

We have to keep in mind Eversource’s masterplan as explained by president, Bill Quinlan, “The Northern Pass is just the first of many projects we have planned for NH.” Indeed, the Northern Pass is the North-South backbone of Eversource’s future projects. Other projects will utilize all that land HQ has bought up in the state and the big plan is to have several arms reaching out across the state East and West, a giant cobweb of power lines bisecting the NP line and utterly destroying the beauty, livelihood, health and harmony of our state.

With the Eversource/HQ plan, NH would lead the country in expanding an archaic energy transmission system and would be so submerged in what it cost that we would not have the resources to explore clean, renewable energy that SAVES the Earth and all life therein.

That is, UNLESS we New Hampshire citizens actively say, “NO to Northern Pass!”  Send your letter to the Site Evaluation Committee, c/o Pamela Monroe, Administrator, 21 S. Fruit St., Suite 10, Concord, NH 03301 or email: Pamela.Monroe@sec.nh.gov.

Updating Perspectives on Vaccines

April 22, 2017

This month, “The Truth About Vaccines”, a series of seven videos on Youtube, continued the discussion begun in February to put the administration of vaccines in clearer perspective.

Historically, communicable disease was pretty much under control in the US following WWII for three reasons: better water with improved sanitation, better food supply, and improved living conditions. The polio epidemic was in tandem with our use of DDT and declined when DDT was banned.

The round of childhood diseases has been credited with building strong immune systems for the rest of our lives. Most of the diseases were not lethal and just meant children happily missed a few days of school while they acquired a strong immune system.

However, today the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) protocols include 46 doses of vaccine by the age of 5, 26 doses in the first 18 months, 69 doses from birth to age 18. This protocol is mandatory for entrance to schools and some forms of employment.

At issue today is the fact that the vaccines carry substances such as thymerisol (mercury), aluminum, formaldehyde, and other substances to stimulate an immune response. Many of these substances cross the blood brain barrier and result in neurogenitive diseases like autism, Lyme disease, bowel disease, ADHD, Shaken Baby Syndrome , vision and hearing problems, and more.

In 1986 congress passed the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act (NCVIA). Subsequently, pharmaceutical companies used scare tactics to convince the public that we were in for big epidemics if we didn’t vaccinate against potential threats. Pharmaceutical companies had been sued for years and threatened to stop making vaccines unless the government didn’t intervene. In 2011, the Supreme Court overturned that law (the only dissenters were Justices Ginsberg and Sotomayor). The Pharmaceutical companies can no longer be sued for vaccine caused injury.

The CDC owns over 50 patents to vaccines – a major conflict of interest when establishing protocols. Top officials in the CDC continually move to executive positions in pharmaceutical companies and back again to work at the CDC. Sounds a lot like the fox minding the henhouse.

What can we do to inform ourselves? There will be more video presentations as more physicians come forward with the results they are seeing in their practice and more research is finding ways to be published. Unfortunately, physicians risk losing their license to practice, researchers have difficulty getting their findings published, and both groups may lose teaching positions/livelihood.

However, the tide is turning, the public is becoming more informed and actively demanding to have competent research on the safety and efficacy of every vaccine, and parental rights to decide what goes into and stays out of our bodies. We can support physicians and research that honor scientific inquiry.

Beware NP, Hydro Quebec’s Way of Going

March 23, 2017

To understand reservations New Hampshire people have for Hydro Quebec/Eversource’s Northern Pass on our health, we need to know the story of Hydro Quebec’s takeover of Hydro power in Labrador at Churchill Falls. See “The Churchill Falls Contract and why Newfoundlanders can’t get over it” by James P. Feehan, Melvin Baker, 9/1/2010.

Here’s the history: Quebec was uncomfortable when Labrador’s water rights were established in 1927, and would not allow Labrador hydropower to be transmitted across Quebec territory to markets in Ontario or the US.

In 1958, the British Newfoundland Corp. (BRINCO) received extensive land and water rights to Newfoundland and Labrador and created the Hamilton Falls Power Co (HFPCo), later renamed Churchill Falls Labrador Corp. (CFLCo) as a federally incorporated subsidiary. The Shawinigan Engineering Co. bought a 20 percent interest.

In 1962, the Quebec government decided to nationalize all privately-owned electricity generating companies in the province. As a result, Shawingan Engineering’s 20 percent stake became the property of Hydro Quebec.  Later, HQ drew up a pivotal contract with CFLCo to snag Churchill Falls.

How? Here is the HQ 65 year Contract, agreed to through a corrupt political finesse in 1976 as follows:  From 1976-2016: CFLCo would sell to Hydro Quebec approximately 31 billion MWh/year for a period of 40 years. The price would be 3 mills (3 tenths of a cent) per KWh for the first 5 years, then decline to 2.5 mills for the last 15 years. At the end of 40 years, the contract would “automatically” be renewed for 25 years at 2 mills/KWh.

In 1974, the Quebec government purchased BRINCo’s  65.8  percent of shares. All attempts to renegotiate the contract’s terms failed as energy prices escalated in the 70s and CFLCo had increasing difficulty funding the CF generating station. Hydro Quebec turned a titanic profit on the deal.

2016-2041 – When the contract was renewed at 2 mills (2 tenths of a cent) per KWh for 25 more years, Hydro Quebec could resell its energy for 85 mills (8.5 cents) per KWh.

It does not take rocket science to recognize how HydroQuebec makes its money. Or how ruthless is its way of going within the province it shares with Newfoundland. Or how senseless NH would be to allow HQ to cross New Hampshire territory to markets in MA and NY.

The new HQ moneymaker would be to strap New Hampshire with the albatross of the Northern Pass and stifle further development of clean energy such as solar and yet to be developed other forms of bona fide renewable energy. New forms of energy could potentially save our forests, our culture, our watersheds, our wildlife, our tourist industry, our real estate, our lives.

Please read and consider the following link and mark your calendar: https://manchesterinklink.com/northern-pass-foes-plan-circle-state-house-april-23